📷 USC HANDBOOK

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USC Sailing Preparation for Crew: WHAT TO WEAR AND WHAT TO BRING

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WHAT TO WEAR:

SUNSCREEN:A minimum of SPF 15

SUNGLASSES

HATwith a brim (such as a baseball cap)

CLOTHING:

•  Dress for the weather – shorts or long pants

•  T-Shirt (bare shoulders can be risky) 

•  Light soled canvas shoes or sandals – No flip flops or BLACK soled shoes (they mark the boats) 

•  REMEMBER – These shoes may get wet!

•  Light jacket or sweatshirt in case of a cool breeze

•  Slicker of foul weather gear if rain is forecasted

•  Sailing Gloves (optional)

•  An extra set of dry clothes

•  SPRING & FALL SAILING – Dress in layers and Dress Warmly, including a fleece and windbreaker. It is cooler on the water than the air temperature on land.

WHAT TO BRING:

Water– We cannot emphasize enough the importance of bringing water to re-hydrate (Caffeinated drinks contribute to dehydration during physical activities)

FOR LUNCH AND FRESH AIR APPETITES:

Pack food in an insulated container – don’t count on refrigeration.

Plenty of fluids, especially water – the sun and wind will dehydrate a person, regardless of air temperature. 

WE SUGGEST PUTTING YOUR ITEMS IN A BACKPACK OR DUFFLE BAG.(Do not use paper bags!)

Ask the captainwhat he or she may want or need as support:

· Food & beverages 

· Gear or equipment

· Offer to help or pay for slip space, moorings, water taxi rides, etc.

· Don’t assume you know them or their needs

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Safe Sailing Checklist and Preparations - Prior to Departure:

  • Go for at least one practice sail with your crew, if possible.
  • Conduct a man overboard drill with all of your crew. 
  • Make sure your fuel, water, and batteries are topped off.
  • Empty your holding tank before departure, and monitor during trip.
  • Make sure all deck gear is lashed down.
  • Check lifelines, stanchions, rigging, and cotter/split pins
  • Check blocks, shackles and make sure they are lubricated and tight
  • Check sails, bimini, dodger for damage, and get repaired. Bring sail tape.
  • Check and lube winches, if needed. 
  • Check running lights, deck, steaming lights and anchor light.
  • Make sure that you have spare bulbs aboard for all navigation and cabin lights.
  • Check your life ring or life sling. Make sure you have enough rope and that it is in good condition. 
  • Check propane and propane locker. Check for leaks and carry a spare bottle.
  • Check that VHF is working. Do a radio check on ch. 9, not 16. 
  • Check that boarding ladder is in working order and secured.
  • Emergency Tiller. Do a test run. 
  • Check your anchor and rode.  Make sure that anchor rode is strong and ready to deploy.
  • Ensure that all cabinets and locker doors, refrigerator and cabin doors will stay shut and secure in heavy weather
  • Check and inspect all seacocks to make sure they open and close.
  • Make a diagram of where all seacocks are located and post where crew can get to it.
  • Attach a wooden plug within reach of every seacock.
  • Make sure that all hose clamps are in place and tight.
  • Check your engine and have it serviced before you leave. Make sure you have spare belts, oil and fuel filters, Racor filters, impellers, as well as the tools to change them.
  • Make sure you have spare oil and transmission fluid. Check oil levels daily.
  • Check that your first aid kit is up to date and replace any expired item.
  • Carry seasickness remedies like Bonine, Bioband, or fresh ginger. 
  • Check all electrical wiring, lights and fans.

Safety Equipment

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Other Considerations Keep a ships log. Watch for crew fatigue, overexposure, and seasickness. Assig

  • Life jackets (PFD's) for each crew member 
  • Manual Bilge Pumps, buckets
  • Wood plugs attached to each through-hull fitting
  • Fire Extinguishers (current), at least two (2)
  • First Aid Kit(s) and first aid manual
  • Foghorn or whistle
  • Handheld GPS and extra batteries.
  • Paper charts or chart book showing area where you are going to be sailing
  • Jack lines
  • Tethers
  • Rigging Knife
  • Flares or Flare kit
  • Fully provisioned ditch bag
  • EPIRB (can be rented from Boat US)
  • Life raft / inflated dinghy (life raft rented from Vane Brothers, Baltimore)
  • Radar Reflector
  • Emergency Navigation Lights
  • Water-resistant spotlight
  • Emergency Tiller 

Other Considerations

Keep a ships log.

Watch for crew fatigue, overexposure, and seasickness. 

Assign tasks and crew positions. Delegate responsibilities. 

Be ready for hourly USC radio check-ins on channel  ___________

Phone numbers for each skipper, or other crewmembers. 

Have fun and enjoy!

Wind Conditions

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The Beaufort Scale: In 1806, Sir Francis Beaufort developed a rating system for accurate recording of wind speed. This system was developed for sailors, but has since been modified for use on land.

Wind Speed (MPH)  Wind Effects Observed on Land  Terms Used in NWS Forecasts


0-1  Calm; smoke rises vertically............................................................................................................Calm

1-3    Direction of wind shown by smoke  drift, but not by wind vanes..........................Light

4-7    Wind felt on face, leaves rustle,  ordinary vane moved by wind.............................Light

8-12    Leaves and small twigs in constant motion; wind extends light flag..............Gentle 

13-18    Raises dust and loose paper; small  branches are moved...................................Moderate

19-24    Small trees in leaf begin to sway crested wavelets form on inland  waters...Fresh

25-31    Large branches in motion; whistling heard in telephone wires; umbrellas  used with difficulty..........................................................................................................................................................Strong

32-38    Whole trees in motion; inconvenience felt walking against the wind............Strong

39-46    Breaks twigs off trees; generally impedes progress. ...............................................Gale

47-54    Slight structural damage occurs; chimney pots and stales removed............Gale

55-63    Seldom experienced inland; trees    Whole gale uprooted; considerable structural damage occurs......................................................................................................................................................Gale

64-72    Very rarely experienced inland; accompanied by widespread damage.....Whole gale

73 or more  Very rarely experienced; accompanied by widespread  damage............Hurricane